The Snug

Welcome to The Snug - a friendly place for discussions created by the community for the community. Register a free account today to become a member! Once signed in, you'll be able to participate on this site by adding your own topics and posts, as well as connect with other members through your own private inbox!

I Can’t Believe I’m 70

Huntn

Misty Mountains Envoy
Joined
Mar 24, 2022
Messages
1,432
Reaction score
1,370
Location
Chupacabra wrestling in Tejas
I can remember looking in the mirror as a 16 year old (1969) shuddering at the idea of being 47 years old in 2000, god, being old, and wondering if I’d still have hair. I still have some, just not on top. ;) Now, it feels like that was another life, how things have changed so much, and so many moved onto the next phase whatever that is. No I’m not worried about the Grim Reaper, because I don’t think the journey will be over, just reflecting about this life, this taste of a reality.

When you are young, you think you have forever, but the reality is time accelerates and it flies by faster than you think it will. I could add, it’s just as well, as things for humanity seem to be going to hell. I’ve said it before, that this could be The Earth Simulator, one of thousands of experience offered as the next adventure you're sure you want to go on, have some excitement and adventure, only $10k credits. :D
 
Happy birthday? 🥳

Waiting for the inevitable follow-up post later where you look back on reasoning about age as a seventy-year-old youngster.
 
Anyway you're just a young whippersnapper. Let's put it this way. No matter how fast you run, you'll never catch up with me!

If you were to run at relativistic speeds @Huntn might just catch up!

 
If you were to run at relativistic speeds @Huntn might just catch up!

From a psychologic perspective, time does fly faster and faster as we age:

1691884591950.png




My kids definitely exist on a different timescale. For me it's also making matters worse that I work 3x harder than in my 20s days had remained only 24h long.
 
From a psychologic perspective, time does fly faster and faster as we age:

View attachment 885




My kids definitely exist on a different timescale. For me it's also making matters worse that I work 3x harder than in my 20s days had remained only 24h long.


It just makes sense to me that as we get older, time does seem to go faster. I mean each day elapsed for a 70-year-old is a way shorter fraction of a whole lifetime than is a day in the life of a ten-year-old.

Although I'd not like to relive any particular era of my lfie, I do kinda miss the times when a summer day seemed almost endless. Now just about any day even in dead of winter seems like "whoa, where did the time fly to?" by around lunchtime... even when I rise with the light (or in darkness during winters).

On the other hand a winter doesn't seem as long as it felt like years ago, which here in the Catskills can be a good thing. A Catskills winter, even with climate change, is a season that writers continue to joke about as being "nine months of snow and three months of very poor sledding." At least when we get older, whatever season we don't care for flies by just as fast as the ones we prefer!
 
It just makes sense to me that as we get older, time does seem to go faster. I mean each day elapsed for a 70-year-old is a way shorter fraction of a whole lifetime than is a day in the life of a ten-year-old.
That is a very nice, and true perspective. I used to study brain atrophy (more like cortical thinning) in certain contexts. Cortical thinning hasn't necessarily been a bad thing, as it can mean increased efficiency. That's sort of what happens in the later teens, when synaptic pruning kills off a lot of "impractical" connection in the brain (if any of you wondered where their youthful imagination went...).

As we age we are also getting challenged less and less which means increasing efficiency with daily tasks and more time spent in autopilot mode, ie., without conscious processing. So I'd hypothesize that our perception of time is greatly impacted by, or may even be defined by the amount we spend consciously processing things.
 
That is a very nice, and true perspective. I used to study brain atrophy (more like cortical thinning) in certain contexts. Cortical thinning hasn't necessarily been a bad thing, as it can mean increased efficiency. That's sort of what happens in the later teens, when synaptic pruning kills off a lot of "impractical" connection in the brain (if any of you wondered where their youthful imagination went...).

As we age we are also getting challenged less and less which means increasing efficiency with daily tasks and more time spent in autopilot mode, ie., without conscious processing. So I'd hypothesize that our perception of time is greatly impacted by, or may even be defined by the amount we spend consciously processing things.

Re
As we age we are also getting challenged less and less...

Heh, wait until your kids are teenagers, man. They will slice and dice those words into your salad!

But it's true that (for better or worse) the longer we live the more we can turn over to autopilot. It's why it pays to keep learning new stuff so our brains don't decide that we don't need that option any more. I make myself carry on learning Portuguese even if machine-translation has improved since the day a few years ago when I couldn't stretch my other Romance languages far enough to translate a novel I wanted to read.

I do notice that I have to keep practicing though, because whatever most recently acquired "second language" one learns is always the first one to depart! I have already lost most of the Russian and German I used to know, not that I had become fluent in either. I'm determined not to let the Portuguese slide in that direction since I bothered to try to acquire ability to read it more easily. The popularly presumed overlap with Spanish has a lot of astonishing deviations (who'd guess that "precisar" in Portuguese is "necesitar" in Spanish, for instance) and I got tired of guessing within context or reaching for a dictionary every five minutes.
 
It's why it pays to keep learning new stuff so our brains don't decide that we don't need that option any more.
I think of stuff like this when I'm doing the NYT puzzles like Wordle or Letter Boxed. Even when I'm just staring at them wondering where to go next, I like that my brain is being challenged.

And happy belated birthday, @Huntn! I'm in your general vicinity, age-wise. It's an interesting phase of life. The bad part is, obviously, watching those in your peer group and how older age is affecting them. Two have already died in their fifties, one just got tested for something which may or may not be very bad (waiting for results), and my wife and I have our own (so far) minor problems.

When we get together we do laugh in recognition that we're always exchanging stories about our health and aches and pains, just like the old people we used to make fun of when we were young.
 
Re


Heh, wait until your kids are teenagers, man. They will slice and dice those words into your salad!

But it's true that (for better or worse) the longer we live the more we can turn over to autopilot. It's why it pays to keep learning new stuff so our brains don't decide that we don't need that option any more. I make myself carry on learning Portuguese even if machine-translation has improved since the day a few years ago when I couldn't stretch my other Romance languages far enough to translate a novel I wanted to read.

I do notice that I have to keep practicing though, because whatever most recently acquired "second language" one learns is always the first one to depart! I have already lost most of the Russian and German I used to know, not that I had become fluent in either. I'm determined not to let the Portuguese slide in that direction since I bothered to try to acquire ability to read it more easily. The popularly presumed overlap with Spanish has a lot of astonishing deviations (who'd guess that "precisar" in Portuguese is "necesitar" in Spanish, for instance) and I got tired of guessing within context or reaching for a dictionary every five minutes.
I’ve always had an interest creating ”art”, at one point I wanted to be an architect. I majored in commercial art in college because everything else seemed boring, and I was headed to the Air Force to be a pilot. This is why my interest in creating a serene scene for personal escape, working with Unreal Editor has been a great help keeping the brain active, as it also reveals how much I’ve slipped as far as mental sharpness since my younger days. :unsure: I have to take copious notes and rely on them to stay on top of what I’ve “learned”. :oops:

Unreal Engine, the Unreal Editor is a major game engine, also used in CGI production of backgounds in movies and TV, allows you to create an interactive photorealistic environment. It is free to use and play with.

88245A21-41ED-4391-8D10-CB2684495DFC.jpeg

…not my scene. :)
 
…it also reveals how much I’ve slipped as far as mental sharpness since my younger days.
You know when I first started noticing that happening? In my late thirties or early forties. My typing WPM was on its way down. I could either type slower to maintain the same low number of mistakes, or type my usual speed and di it lkke ths. 😄

And I remember my horrified reaction: “Already???”
 
Back
Top